The Vanishing

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goodman brigadoonOnce a long, long time ago (well, the 1940s and the 1950s) the word musical theater didn’t really mean a collection of jukebox hits that your parents listened to, or a musical version of either a Disney film or a gritty British movie with music written by pop culture icons. The dirty phrase “Andrew Lloyd Webber” was mercifully unknown.  During that time a musical meant a show with gorgeous, lush scores, transportive stories that can still at times stretch credulity, unabashed emotionalism that can border on the silly and campy.  Though American musical theater at its height was the last unapologetic bastion of feel-good escapism during the time when film and dramatic plays were moving towards heightened naturalism and raw portrayal of emotions, it still produced some of the most unforgettable music existing from the incomparable talents of Rodgers and Hart, then Hammerstein; Leonard Bernstein; Bock and Harnick, Lerner and Loewe.  So when I heard that the Goodman Theater was going to stage a revitalized, possibly re-envisioned take on Alan Jay Lerner’s and Frederick Loewe’s 1947 classic about a Scottish village that only appears once in a hundred years, I was intrigued but unconvinced. Can I, a 21st century musical theater queen ravenously brought up on a diet of realistic Sondheim, literary Boublil and Schoenberg,  grounded Ahrens and Flaherty, cerebral Guettel, with pop-music drizzles from Elton John and Cyndi Lauper, actually like a show with a story as incredible as this? Plus I wasn’t a fan of Gene Kelly’s stilted film version (the elegant, aristocratic Cyd Charisse is about as believable as an 18th century Scottish peasant maid as Matt Bomer is as my massage therapist…I mean really?). But as I’ve said so many times on this blog over the years, I love going to the theater and becoming inexplicably, memorably astounded. Brigadoon, marking the significant Goodman debut of Rachel Rockwell, one of Chicago’s most talented theater directors, is enthralling, superb, inarguably enjoyable, lingering with you days after you see it, setting a high bar for musical theater in Chicago and regional theaters as a whole.

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Starry Night

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victory gardens death and the maidenWith the number of nationally-anticipated/written-up/reviewed theater productions this summer in Chicago, you’d expect there to be more people coming into town to see a show than to go eat a turkey leg at the Taste of Chicago. Broadway in Chicago has the world premiere of Sting’s first foray into musical theater, The Last Ship, set to transfer to New York this fall. Over at Steppenwolf,  Michael  Cera, a major name for the millennial audiences that arts organizations covet, is headlining another production scheduled for a Broadway run in the fall, Kenneth Lonergan’s This is Our Youth. At the Goodman, a major revival of Brigadoon, with a revised book and the active collaboration of Alan Jay Lerner’s daughter Lisa, is running.  And at Victory Gardens Theater, a revival of Ariel Dorfman’s Death and the Maiden stars Sandra Oh in her first project after her celebrated though much-lamented departure from the TV hit Grey’s Anatomy. As an Asian theatergoer this production is probably the most notable for me since it gives me an opportunity to see in live performance the most successful Asian actor of my generation.  And Oh, riveting and emotionally committed, doesn’t disappoint, powerfully anchoring a play that has so many internal logic questions that the audience’s ability to suspend disbelief, so integral in good theater, is continuously challenged throughout the ninety minute running time.

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